*Not my problem*
When I was about 15 years old and decided to wear the hijab when no one else was, I had to withstand severe criticism and ridicule (imho) for a 15 year old girl. I did not falter because in my heart I knew it was the right thing to do. If anyone didn’t like it, it was their problem, not mine.
When I left my high school to go to boarding school at 16, some of the teachers were no…t happy, I didn’t understand back then why, but I guess good students add to a school’s performance and reputation. I left because it was the right thing for me to do. If anyone wasn’t happy, it was their problem, not mine.
When I accepted a scholarship to study medicine overseas at the age of 17, I was criticised for not studying medicine in Malaysia, which has equally good medical schools. I accepted the scholarship because I thought I would learn more than just medicine. If anyone didn’t agree, it was their problem, not mine.
When I returned to Malaysia to work after passing the MRCP, I joined the physiology department as a lecturer and I was ridiculed by (some, not all) of the medical department for not joining them, since it is not easy to pass the MMED/MRCP exam, and so it was an insult (to them) that someone who had passed would choose to do something else like teach physiology. I made that decision for my kids who were young and in need of my attention, and since we were living in Kelantan with a maid, away from extended family, it was right for me and my family. If anyone didn’t like it, it was their problem, not mine.
I did not choose to leave the public service, I left by accident. I was an employee of a public university and I applied to join another similar institution, but all deans (of medical schools) have made a gentlemen’s agreement not to accept another’s staff, so I had to resign first before applying. This was when an offer came in from a private institution. If I had my way, I’d still be in public service and I’m strongly considering going back. If anyone isn’t happy with this, it’s their problem, not mine.
When I started my MBA, a lot of people couldn’t understand why a doctor would want to do that, and so yet again, it was their problem, not mine.
When I joined a group of primary care physicians and started to believe in and fight for their cause, people criticised me saying ‘but Mazlyn, you’re not a GP, why are you doing all this?’ Well, I believe in justice. Again, their problem, not mine.
When I joined DAP, a lot of people couldn’t understand why. And a lot of people had a problem with that. Once again, it is their problem, not mine.
I am happy with my life and the decisions I make. — feeling beautiful.See More
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